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ughwhatwhy:

get into the habit of not assuming a person’s gender

(via wertheyouth)

"In the wake of last week’s Supreme Court ruling in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, religious groups are already using the decision to push for more exemptions, and one of the worst is already being petitioned for: The right to refuse to hire LGBT people."

Religious groups are already using the Hobby Lobby ruling to discriminate against LGBT people  (via micdotcom)

(via wertheyouth)

marcoxmarco:

minus18:

For me and my friends growing up, being told things like ‘you have to wear this because that’s what boys wear” or “dresses are for not for your body type” was frustrating and a pretty bad time.




The bottom line for me is, if someone feels happier and more comfortable in a particular ‘type’ of uniform, then that’s something that should be encouraged, not punished. Students have enough to focus on at school, having to fight to be yourself shouldn’t be added to that.



That’s why we’ve launched a new campaign called Gender is Not Uniform.

<3

(via wertheyouth)

glaad:

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs released its annual report on violence against the LGBTQ community and it shows that the overall number of reported hate crimes is still way too high. Additionally, 72% of LGBTQ homicide victims last year were transgender women. Read more here: http://www.glaad.org/blog/infographic-report-shows-anti-lgbtq-violence-still-way-too-high

glaad:

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs released its annual report on violence against the LGBTQ community and it shows that the overall number of reported hate crimes is still way too high. Additionally, 72% of LGBTQ homicide victims last year were transgender women. Read more here: http://www.glaad.org/blog/infographic-report-shows-anti-lgbtq-violence-still-way-too-high

*13

LGBTQ@Dickinson

ellielliott said: Hi, I'm filling out the common app for college as a genderqueer individual, and it says if you want to talk about your gender identity you can in the "additional information" section, but I don't really know how to talk about it specifically for this scenario. Help?

neutrois:

My approach for these things is a practical one. I’d simply state in the additional info section: “My gender identity is ___ (genderqueer, non-binary), which means I do not identify as either male or female.” You can also add “I am transgender” at the beginning, if this applies to you. 

At this point, you are only applying. Except in rare cases, I don’t think it’s necessary to say more. However, I would check what trans-friendly policies the colleges have in place beforehand. Once you get accepted is when you begin addressing individual issues that come up (such as bathroom and dorm room arrangements, etc) with the college of your choice. 

Of course, it’s been 10 years since I went through this myself :P

Readers - what has been your experience?

Great response! We definitely suggest looking into an institution policies regarding LGBTQQIA+ students as part of your search. You can usually find this information in the Student Life or Campus Life section of a college or university’s website. And, if you’re looking for specific information about housing, look for Residential Life or Living on Campus!

freedomtomarry:

Reblog to congratulate Pennsylvania families on this exciting news! http://bit.ly/1gLAiLy

Today, Dickinson Alumnus, Federal District Judge John E. Jones &#8216;77  struck down the Pennsylvania ban on gay marriage! We&#8217;re so excited that this day finally arrived, and we&#8217;re thankful for such a close connection to history!

freedomtomarry:

Reblog to congratulate Pennsylvania families on this exciting news! http://bit.ly/1gLAiLy

Today, Dickinson Alumnus, Federal District Judge John E. Jones ‘77 struck down the Pennsylvania ban on gay marriage! We’re so excited that this day finally arrived, and we’re thankful for such a close connection to history!

knowhomo:

How To Be An Ally If You Are A Person of Privilege
By: Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D. (PDF here)
One way to work for social justice is as an ally.  The gay and lesbian community realized ten or fifteen years ago that, without the help of straight allies, gays and lesbians don’t have the clout needed to fight heterosexist and homophobic legislation.  Gradually the call for allies has spread to other communities in which discrimination is systemic. 
What it means to be an ally varies greatly from person to person.  For some, it means building a relationship of love and trust with another; for others, it means intentionally putting one’s self in harm’s way so that another person remains safe.  Each type of alliance has its own parameters, responsibilities, and degrees of risk.  For example, being an ally to someone who is in a less privileged  position than I am requires different work than is necessary if the person has privileges like mine.  There are also a variety of styles that an ally can use.  Some of us are bold and audacious, others are more reserved.  The common bond is that we align ourselves with a person or people in such a way that we  “have their backs.”
Those of us who have been granted privileges based purely on who we are when born (as white, as male, as straight, and so forth) often feel that either we want to give our privileges back, which we can’t really do, or we want to use them to improve the experiences of those who don’t have our access to power and resources.  One of the most effective ways to use our privilege is to become an ally of those on the other side of the privilege seesaw.  This type of alliance requires a great deal of self-examination on our part as well as the willingness to go against the people who share our privilege status and with whom we are expected to group ourselves. 
[Note: In the following descriptions of ally behavior, the governmental term “target groups” refers to those who are at greatest risk of being targeted for discrimination, e.g., people of color, women, gays and lesbians, people with disabilities, and so on.] 
1.  Allies work continuously to develop an understanding of the person and institutional experiences of the person or people with whom they are aligning themselves.  If the ally is a member of a privileged group, it is essential that he or she also strives for clarity about the impact of privileges on his or her life. 
2.  Allies choose to align themselves publicly and privately with members of target groups and respond to their needs.  This may mean breaking assumed allegiances with those who have the same privileges as you.  It is important not to underestimate the consequences of breaking these agreements and to break them in ways that will be most useful to the person or group with whom you are aligning yourself.  
3.  Allies believe that it is in their interest to be allies and are able to talk about why this is the case.  Talking clearly about having is an important educational tool for others with the same privileges. 
4.  Allies are committed to the never-ending personal growth required to be genuinely supportive.  If both people are without privilege it means coming to grips with the ways that internalized oppression affects you.  If you are privileged , uprooting long-held beliefs about the way that the world works will probably be necessary.   
5.  Allies are able to articulate how various patterns of oppression have served to keep them in privileged positions or to withhold opportunities they might otherwise have.  For many of us, this means exploring and owning our dual roles as oppressor and oppressed, as uncomfortable as that might be. 
6.  Allies expect to make some mistakes but do not use that as an excuse for inaction.  As a person with privilege, it is important to study and to talk about how your privilege acts as both a shield and blinders for you.  Of necessity, those without privileges in a certain area know more about the specific examples of privilege than those who are privileged. 
7.  Allies know that those on each side of an alliance hold responsibility for their own changes, whether or not people on the other side choose to respond or to thank them.  They are also clear that they are doing this work for themselves, not to “take care of” the other. 
8.  Allies know that, in the most empowered and genuine ally relationships, the persons of privilege initiate the change toward personal, institutional, and societal justice and equality. 
9.  Allies promote a sense of inclusiveness and justice in the organization, and hold greater responsibility for seeing changes throughout their conclusions. 
10. Allies with privilege are responsible for taking the lead in changing the organization, helping to create an environment that is hospitable for all.   
11. Allies are able to laugh at themselves as they make mistakes and at the real, but absurd, systems of supremacy in which we all live.  As many oppressed people know, humor is a method of survival.  Those with privilege must be very careful not to assume that we can join in the humor of those in a target group with whom we are in alliance. 
12. Allies understand that emotional safety is not a realistic expectation if we take our alliance seriously. For those with privilege, the goal is to “become comfortable with the uncomfortable and uncomfortable with the too-comfortable” and to act to alter the too-comfortable. 
13. Allies know the consequences of not being clear about the other’s experience.  Some of these are: 
•  Lack of trust 
•  Lack of authentic relationships 
•  Lack of foundation for coalition 
For allies with privilege, the consequences of being unclear are even greater. Because our behaviors are rooted in privilege, those who are in our group give greater credence to our actions than they might if we were members of groups without privilege

knowhomo:

How To Be An Ally If You Are A Person of Privilege

By: Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D. (PDF here)

One way to work for social justice is as an ally.  The gay and lesbian community realized ten or fifteen years ago that, without the help of straight allies, gays and lesbians don’t have the clout needed to fight heterosexist and homophobic legislation.  Gradually the call for allies has spread to other communities in which discrimination is systemic. 

What it means to be an ally varies greatly from person to person.  For some, it means building a relationship of love and trust with another; for others, it means intentionally putting one’s self in harm’s way so that another person remains safe.  Each type of alliance has its own parameters, responsibilities, and degrees of risk.  For example, being an ally to someone who is in a less privileged  position than I am requires different work than is necessary if the person has privileges like mine.  There are also a variety of styles that an ally can use.  Some of us are bold and audacious, others are more reserved.  The common bond is that we align ourselves with a person or people in such a way that we  “have their backs.”

Those of us who have been granted privileges based purely on who we are when born (as white, as male, as straight, and so forth) often feel that either we want to give our privileges back, which we can’t really do, or we want to use them to improve the experiences of those who don’t have our access to power and resources.  One of the most effective ways to use our privilege is to become an ally of those on the other side of the privilege seesaw.  This type of alliance requires a great deal of self-examination on our part as well as the willingness to go against the people who share our privilege status and with whom we are expected to group ourselves. 

[Note: In the following descriptions of ally behavior, the governmental term “target groups” refers to those who are at greatest risk of being targeted for discrimination, e.g., people of color, women, gays and lesbians, people with disabilities, and so on.] 

1.  Allies work continuously to develop an understanding of the person and institutional experiences of the person or people with whom they are aligning themselves.  If the ally is a member of a privileged group, it is essential that he or she also strives for clarity about the impact of privileges on his or her life. 

2.  Allies choose to align themselves publicly and privately with members of target groups and respond to their needs.  This may mean breaking assumed allegiances with those who have the same privileges as you.  It is important not to underestimate the consequences of breaking these agreements and to break them in ways that will be most useful to the person or group with whom you are aligning yourself.  

3.  Allies believe that it is in their interest to be allies and are able to talk about why this is the case.  Talking clearly about having is an important educational tool for others with the same privileges. 

4.  Allies are committed to the never-ending personal growth required to be genuinely supportive.  If both people are without privilege it means coming to grips with the ways that internalized oppression affects you.  If you are privileged , uprooting long-held beliefs about the way that the world works will probably be necessary.   

5.  Allies are able to articulate how various patterns of oppression have served to keep them in privileged positions or to withhold opportunities they might otherwise have.  For many of us, this means exploring and owning our dual roles as oppressor and oppressed, as uncomfortable as that might be. 

6.  Allies expect to make some mistakes but do not use that as an excuse for inaction.  As a person with privilege, it is important to study and to talk about how your privilege acts as both a shield and blinders for you.  Of necessity, those without privileges in a certain area know more about the specific examples of privilege than those who are privileged. 

7.  Allies know that those on each side of an alliance hold responsibility for their own changes, whether or not people on the other side choose to respond or to thank them.  They are also clear that they are doing this work for themselves, not to “take care of” the other. 

8.  Allies know that, in the most empowered and genuine ally relationships, the persons of privilege initiate the change toward personal, institutional, and societal justice and equality. 

9.  Allies promote a sense of inclusiveness and justice in the organization, and hold greater responsibility for seeing changes throughout their conclusions. 

10. Allies with privilege are responsible for taking the lead in changing the organization, helping to create an environment that is hospitable for all.   

11. Allies are able to laugh at themselves as they make mistakes and at the real, but absurd, systems of supremacy in which we all live.  As many oppressed people know, humor is a method of survival.  Those with privilege must be very careful not to assume that we can join in the humor of those in a target group with whom we are in alliance. 

12. Allies understand that emotional safety is not a realistic expectation if we take our alliance seriously. For those with privilege, the goal is to “become comfortable with the uncomfortable and uncomfortable with the too-comfortable” and to act to alter the too-comfortable. 

13. Allies know the consequences of not being clear about the other’s experience.  Some of these are: 

•  Lack of trust 

•  Lack of authentic relationships 

•  Lack of foundation for coalition 

For allies with privilege, the consequences of being unclear are even greater. Because our behaviors are rooted in privilege, those who are in our group give greater credence to our actions than they might if we were members of groups without privilege

plutonianhipster:

policymic:

Gender stereotypes are limiting our sons and our daughters

Patriarchal notions of manhood don’t just harm women, they hurt men. Toxic definitions of masculinity lead to well-documented problems like high rates of gun violence, suicide and sexual violence. That’s why organizations like the Representation Project are committed to advancing the discussion about how gender limits the freedoms of both women and men. They recognize that society’s gender ideals aren’t only damaging for women; they’re universally harmful.

Their latest video examines how stereotypes constrain all people from the moment they are born.

Watch the full video | Follow policymic

Yes please and thank you with a cuppa Rosie

(Source: micdotcom, via pawsupdicksout)

shortformblog:

Houston Mayor Annise Parker, right, got married to her partner yesterday. Parker, the first openly gay mayor of a major city, has been in a relationship with Kathy Hubbard for 23 years. With gay marriage banned in Texas, the couple had to go to California to exchange vows—though she had previously said she would not get married until same-sex marriage was legal in her home state.

shortformblog:

Houston Mayor Annise Parker, right, got married to her partner yesterday. Parker, the first openly gay mayor of a major city, has been in a relationship with Kathy Hubbard for 23 years. With gay marriage banned in Texas, the couple had to go to California to exchange vows—though she had previously said she would not get married until same-sex marriage was legal in her home state.